Archive for the Uncategorized Category

Maui – provence

Posted in Uncategorized on March 25, 2013 by bigfoot hawaii

province 3province 1

Stuggart, Germany resident and parttime Bigfoot volunteer, Maria F., sent these photos for clarification. Her investigation led her to this forgot monument to Chinese immigration in Hawaii. Bigfoot has been linked to this actual site near heavily wooded Iao Valley.

Advertisements

Lion and Bigfoot

Posted in ISLAND OF HAWAII, ISLAND OF KAUAI, ISLAND OF MAUI, ISLAND OF OAHU, Uncategorized on July 8, 2012 by bigfoot hawaii

Bigfoot researchers reach out to “good luck”, before looking for Bigfoot.

Tradition plays a large part of diverse Hawaii cultures. Bigfoot may become one soon.

OPS SUPPORT – OAHU

Posted in Uncategorized with tags on May 18, 2010 by bigfoot hawaii

Night shift bus drivers, in the rural routes, claim to see large hairy creatures dart across  highways, leaping over barricades effortlessly. Bus drivers are part of The Bigfoot Sighting and Reporting Center of Hawaii’s network.

Bigfoot spotters regularly volunteer for night ops. Many say they have seen a Sasquatch-like monster and just need verification.

Ala Wai Harbor boaters report sightings frequently as they circumnavigate the islands.

These boats will leave out in the early evening, hugging  the coastline, hoping to report Bigfoot nocturnal activity.

SOUND BLASTING – KONA

Posted in ISLAND OF HAWAII, Uncategorized with tags on April 30, 2010 by bigfoot hawaii

The BSB seen here is located in Kona; obscured by coconut trees it goes about its business of tracking Bigfoot.

Kona Ops (TBSRCH) carefully selected this spot due to the number of reports and sightings of a huge hairy creature in the area.

SOUND BLASTING – HILO

Posted in ISLAND OF HAWAII, Uncategorized with tags on April 30, 2010 by bigfoot hawaii

 The Bigfoot Sighting and Reporting Center of Hawaii – Hilo Ops has erected the first batch of Bigfoot Sound Blasters (BSB). Maui, Oahu, and Kauai BSBs are in various stages of completion.

The BSBs produce a low frequency impulse (a grunt-like sound), well below the auditory range of humans.  The sound is not harmful to wildlife. Motion sensor cameras have been strategically hidden in vegetation, near BSBs to capture any Bigfoot movement within a 50 meter area.

The Bigfoot Sighting and Reporting Center of Hawaii (TBSRSH)  uses solar energy to power several of its BSBs.

The BSBs locations were chosen based on reportings.  BSBs are, inconspicuously, along the shoreline and in remote forested areas throughout the state.